Joaquin Murrieta: Life and Adventures of the Celebrated Bandit : His Exploits in the State of California

By Ireneo Paz; Francis P. Belle | Go to book overview

Chapter XVI

A short time after his departure from Diamond Springs, the chief and his companions established their provisional camp on the northern branch of the Stanislaus River. That place seemed to them at night to be far from all habitation; but when the rays of dawn appeared, they were disagreeably surprised to find that a short distance away there was a camp, evidently occupied by Frenchmen. It seemed they had not noticed the proximity of that danger. They were completely ignorant as to the kind of neighbors they had. When the bandits asked them why they were living in such a secluded place, the Frenchmen replied without the slightest suspicion of fear that they were miners and were looking for gold.

“We are also miners,” said Joaquin, “and we want to find plenty of ore if it is possible.”

“Oh, it is indeed possible. The place is excellent, and ore abundant. But,” said the miner with an accent which proclaimed his origin, “you have no implements with which to work.”

“Yes, we have everything necessary; are you sure this is a good place?”

“Perfectly. Do you think that four or five men would amuse themselves by working for nothing? No, we have found what we consider a good claim, and have decided to remain in the great republic as long as we can.”

“You will live in it a shorter time than you imagine,” said Joaquin, drawing his revolver, his companions doing likewise, “unless you hand over to us immediately the last particle of gold you have.”

Seeing the threatening attitude and the firm resolution of the Mexicans, the five Frenchmen had no illusions concerning the danger they were in. Four of them rushed into their cabins and reappeared armed with pistols. But before they could aim them, Jack and Valenzuela had taken off the tops of their heads. The fifth miner

-80-

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Joaquin Murrieta: Life and Adventures of the Celebrated Bandit : His Exploits in the State of California
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • I - The Historical Joaquín xii
  • II - Biography xviii
  • III - Translation and Plagiarism of Ridge's Work xxv
  • IV - Joaquín Murrieta as Myth xxxvii
  • V - Joaquín Murrieta in Narrative Fiction xlviii
  • VI - Joaquín Murrieta in Poetry lix
  • VII - Joaquín Murrieta in Theater and Film lxviii
  • VIII - The Corrido of Joaquín Murrieta lxxviii
  • IX - This Edition xcvi
  • Notes xcviii
  • Bibliography cii
  • Chronology cxii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 7
  • Chapter III 13
  • Chapter IV 18
  • Chapter V 22
  • Chapter VI 29
  • Chapter VII 35
  • Chapter VIII 43
  • Chapter IX 48
  • Chapter X 54
  • Chapter XI 61
  • Chapter XII 65
  • Chapter XIII 69
  • Chapter XIV 72
  • Chapter XV 76
  • Chapter XVI 80
  • Chapter XVII 86
  • Chapter XVIII 90
  • Chapter XIX 94
  • Chapter XX 99
  • Chapter XXI 107
  • Chapter XXII 113
  • Chapter XXIII 118
  • Chapter XXIV 123
  • Chapter XXV 128
  • Chapter XXVI 135
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