Joaquin Murrieta: Life and Adventures of the Celebrated Bandit : His Exploits in the State of California

By Ireneo Paz; Francis P. Belle | Go to book overview

Chapter XXIII

While Jack was settling with such energy the question of the division of the spoils, another scene no less curious was taking place in the end opposite the table where the bandits were seated. One of the men who was on that side got up at the moment that Jack was making his statements in such a formidable manner, and moving toward the fire, looked at Jack Three Fingers stupidly, yet with some admiration. Then he returned to his table and spoke some words in the ears of his companions. Without doubt, these words were of some importance, for they had the effect of making six or eight persons who accompanied their informant leave the cabin.

Murrieta and his friend followed them into the darkness, and saw that they went toward a cabin situated about fifty feet from there. Believing that Jack Three Fingers must have been the cause of the sudden departure of these individuals, our Mexicans allowed them to enter the house, then drew near, and listened to what was being said within. Joaquin and Valenzuela had drawn their revolvers in order to be prepared to defend themselves in case of attack.

“Did you see him? Did you look at him well?” said one of the men inside the cabin.

“Perfectly,” said another. “I will know him all my life. But are you sure that is the same person?”

“I don’t know; what I do know is that I know him. I have seen him several times in the mountains, and I can swear to you that it is Jack Three Fingers, one of the main members of Joaquin’s gang. I am also positive that Joaquin himself is in San Francisco, for whoever sees one sees the other; you always find them in the same places and seldom are they separated. Therefore, the three men who are sitting with Jack must belong to the crowd.”

“Then boys,” said a third speaker, whose accent showed that he was a son of Ireland, “everything is clear; here is the one by whom the game we have been hunting disappeared last night.”

“What do you mean, Dumps? Explain yourself.”

-118-

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Joaquin Murrieta: Life and Adventures of the Celebrated Bandit : His Exploits in the State of California
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • I - The Historical Joaquín xii
  • II - Biography xviii
  • III - Translation and Plagiarism of Ridge's Work xxv
  • IV - Joaquín Murrieta as Myth xxxvii
  • V - Joaquín Murrieta in Narrative Fiction xlviii
  • VI - Joaquín Murrieta in Poetry lix
  • VII - Joaquín Murrieta in Theater and Film lxviii
  • VIII - The Corrido of Joaquín Murrieta lxxviii
  • IX - This Edition xcvi
  • Notes xcviii
  • Bibliography cii
  • Chronology cxii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 7
  • Chapter III 13
  • Chapter IV 18
  • Chapter V 22
  • Chapter VI 29
  • Chapter VII 35
  • Chapter VIII 43
  • Chapter IX 48
  • Chapter X 54
  • Chapter XI 61
  • Chapter XII 65
  • Chapter XIII 69
  • Chapter XIV 72
  • Chapter XV 76
  • Chapter XVI 80
  • Chapter XVII 86
  • Chapter XVIII 90
  • Chapter XIX 94
  • Chapter XX 99
  • Chapter XXI 107
  • Chapter XXII 113
  • Chapter XXIII 118
  • Chapter XXIV 123
  • Chapter XXV 128
  • Chapter XXVI 135
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