Health Issues among Incarcerated Women

By Ronald L. Braithwaite; Kimberly Jacob Arriola et al. | Go to book overview

1
An Overview of Incarcerated
Women's Health

KIMBERLY JACOB ARRIOLA
RONALD L. BRAITHWAITE
CASSANDRA F. NEWKIRK

I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar
Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of
substance, of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids-and I might even be said to
possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to
see me…. When they approach me they see only my surroundings, them-
selves, or figments of their imagination-indeed, everything and anything
except me.

-Ralph Ellison

Although originally written to chronicle the plight of one who was both black and American, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man (1952/1982) also describes the angst that American society feels towards incarcerated populations, particularly incarcerated women. Largely African American, many incarcerated women bear the quadruple burden of their race/ethnicity, class, gender, and status as a criminal offender. That membership in these social groups—African American, woman, poor, criminal offender—confers serious health risk is clear. How group membership is embodied is much less clear. The invisibility of incarcerated women has resulted in little research and policy development that would advance their health status. Thus it is no surprise that in large part, their health is ailing as compared to incarcerated men and women in the general population (Maruschak and Beck 1997).

Incarcerated women face many of the same health concerns that women in the general population face, only with more frequency and greater seriousness of disease, illness, and injury (Maruschak and Beck 1997). The poorer health status of

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Health Issues among Incarcerated Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 356

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.