Health Issues among Incarcerated Women

By Ronald L. Braithwaite; Kimberly Jacob Arriola et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

8
Substance Use Disorders

JACKIE BUTLER AND KISHA BRAITHWAITE

Female offenders are an increasingly large proportion of the incarcerated population, and their needs are different from those of men in correctional facilities. The goal of this chapter is to discuss the relationship of drug abuse to the increasing rates of female incarceration, to identify the challenges in meeting the unique needs of imprisoned substance-dependent women, and to provide descriptions of a promising intervention approach for this population.

The number of incarcerated women tripled between 1985 and 1997 (Richie 1999). On any given day in 1994, over 800, 000 women were under some type of correctional supervision in the United States (Beck and Gilliard 1995). This total includes women on probation, in jail, in prison, and on parole. For women, the chances of going to prison were six times greater in 2001 (p =.018) than in 1974 (p =.003), and for men, the chances of going to prison were over three times greater in 2001 (p =.113) than in 1974 (p =.036) (Bonczar 2003). Among the percentage of all persons ever confined in prison, the proportion of women increased from 7.8 percent in 1974 to 10.3 percent in 2001 (Bonczar 2003). For a number of years, women have been entering prison at a faster rate than men (Beck and Gillard 1995) The number of incarcerated adult females rose from 142, 000 in 1974 to 581, 000 in 2001. Also, the number of white (non-Hispanic) incarcerated women rose from 86, 000 in 1974 to 225, 000 in 2001 while the number of black women in prison rose from 51, 000 to 231, 000 (Bonczar 2003).

Incarcerated women are disproportionately women of color (particularly black and Hispanic/Latina) from low-income communities who have been subjected to a disproportionately high rate of violence (Richie 1999). Adult black females are nearly two and a half times more likely than adult Hispanic females and five and a half times more likely than adult white females to have ever served time in a state or federal prison. Among adult U.S. residents in 2001, an estimated 1.7

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Health Issues among Incarcerated Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 356

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?