Innovative Interventions to Reduce Dementia Caregiver Distress: A Clinical Guide

By David W. Coon; Dolores Gallagher-Thompson et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

Evidence is continuing to accumulate that family caregivers who experience increased stress and strain due to their participation in care activities arc more likely to have higher morbidity and mortality than caregivers who report little or no difficulty (e.g., Schulz & Beach. 1999). It also is becoming increasingly clear that a pivotal factor in making the decision to place a relative in an institutional setting is the caregiver's appraisal of his or her incapability to continue to provide high-quality care for a loved one in the family setting. As concerned caregivers continue periodically to wrestle with the dilemma of placement, they invariably must consider the delicate balance between their capabilities versus the ever-changing requirements for maintaining high-quality care. The decision to place comes when the balance between these two is eroded. It is clearly understood by researchers, practitioners, and policy makers alike that at the point in caregiving when this occurs, there is a monumental economic impact on both family and societal resources. Perhaps the two most important factors in this equation are perceived decline in their own health status along with increasingly demanding and complex health care and behavioral management requirements with regard to their care-receiver. Because stress and strain are proving to be important determinants of health status, efforts to alleviate these not only may improve quality of life in the family unit, but also may be extremely cost-effective in terms of economic resources by delaying or permanently avoiding institutionalization.

Against this backdrop, it is reasonable to consider any and all assistance programs that might serve this end. However, without careful scrutiny the endpoint of such reasoning could be wasteful “shotgun” intervention programs. It behooves interested professionals to expand their notions of what might be considered potential interventions and begin to implement evaluations of their efficacy and effectiveness in alleviating caregiver stress. Furthermore, as one considers the magnitude of factors that potentially aggravate the tasks of caregiving, one could ask if intervention programs at multiple levels (from the individual to the family system and even to the larger community) may operate symbiotically to enhance quality of life for caregivers or antagonistically to increase the burden and stresses confronting them. At the present time we have limited empirical data to address such questions, and even fewer models that

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Innovative Interventions to Reduce Dementia Caregiver Distress: A Clinical Guide
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.