Innovative Interventions to Reduce Dementia Caregiver Distress: A Clinical Guide

By David W. Coon; Dolores Gallagher-Thompson et al. | Go to book overview

12
Male Caregivers: Challenges
and Opportunities

Sean A. Lauderdale, James A. D'Andrea, and David W. Coon

Until recently, the average caregiver from demographic surveys of persons who are frail and elderly (Stone, Cafferata, & Sangl, 1987) and persons with dementia (Canadian Study of Health and Aging, 1994; Ory, Hoffman, Yee, Tennstedt, & Schulz, 1999) has been either an older woman caring for her husband or a middle-aged daughter caring for her parent (or parent-inlaw). In general, men have comprised only a small proportion of these samples, accounting for approximately 25% of participants. However, changes in societal structure, such as decreasing family size, women's increasing presence in the work force, and increasing life expectancies (Dwyer & Coward, 1992), are expected to significantly impact caregiving demographics by placing more men in caregiving roles. These factors, combined with increased family mobility and larger numbers of single-headed households, will no doubt require more men to assume caregiving responsibilities in the future (Kaye & Applegate, 1990). Indeed, a recent survey of caregivers over the age of 18 providing at least some care to a chronically disabled or ill older person (National Family Caregivers Association, 2000) found that the number of men providing care accounted for almost half of that particular sample (44%). Moreover, many of these men (40%) are providing significant amounts of assistance with activities of daily living (e.g., toileting, bathing, dressing) and nursing care (e.g., administering medications). These findings call attention to the need for practitioners and service providers to consider gender a potential variable that significantly shapes caregiving experiences.

-243-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Innovative Interventions to Reduce Dementia Caregiver Distress: A Clinical Guide
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.