Images of Educational Change

By Herbert Altrichter; John Elliott | Go to book overview

1
Economic change, educational policy
formation and the role of the state

ERNEST R. HOUSE

We live in an age of economic productivity, during a time in which the dominant concerns in all our countries are expanding the economy, raising personal income and increasing the standard of living. No government in liberal democracies can long survive without economic expansion, whether the country is run by conservatives, social democrats or socialists (or apparently communists either). This concern for productivity is manifested in a drive for greater efficiency and has special implications for education. In fact, it is the source of most educational policy at the national level.

Although productivity is a dominant concern in all industrial countries, it results in somewhat different educational policies in each. Britain, the oldest industrial economy, is different from the ageing economy of the United States, which is different again from the mature economies of Japan and Germany, or the relatively young economy of Spain. One national educational system expands, while another contracts painfully. None the less, in most countries educational policies appear to be formulated primarily with regard to the national economy and without sufficient regard for educational practice.

Of course, other factors, like culture and history, influence educational policies as well. For example, racial politics permeates everything in the USA and is not duplicated elsewhere, though some countries show signs of catching up. Britain clings to its eternal class structure, which manifests itself throughout British society. And Spain nurtures a virile traditionalism which suffuses its lifestyle. None the less, despite these differences, in all these countries economic concerns influence educational policy more strongly than anything else at the current time (Wirt and Harman 1986).

I am not saying that economic policies necessarily influence educational practices. Educational practices (everyday teaching and learning patterns of

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Images of Educational Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.