Images of Educational Change

By Herbert Altrichter; John Elliott | Go to book overview

7
Changing school cultures

CHRISTINE FINNAN AND HENRY M. LEVIN


Introduction

Through the important work of educational change researchers, exemplified by Barry MacDonald (1986), Peter Posch (1996) and others (e. g. Cuban 1984; Evans 1996; Fullan and Hargreaves 1996), the ‘black box’ of what happens in schools when innovations are implemented and school change occurs (or doesn't occur) has been opened. One of the discoveries within this ‘black box’ is that schools have a culture. In this chapter we attempt to explain how different conceptualizations of school culture influence our understanding of how and why schools change. We suggest that action research as well as other deep processes of inquiry by members of school communities lead to systematic reflection and understanding of school practices and serve as an impetus to change. Action research processes make participants more aware of the fact that their school has a culture, and give them the tools to change the culture to improve student learning.


What is school culture?

School culture describes both the sameness and the uniqueness of each school. When one enters almost any school one is struck by how familiar it is. There is something about the place that just says ‘school’ – a place to provide a site for teaching and learning – that is palpable. Most schools share a similar design for classrooms and common areas, organize the day in predictable ways and develop recognizable patterns for relationships among the students and adults. Despite these similarities, it is easy to recognize the differences and

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Images of Educational Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.