Images of Educational Change

By Herbert Altrichter; John Elliott | Go to book overview

12
Experts of the future?

CHRISTINE O'HANLON

This chapter addresses ‘images of change’ concerned with the practices of universities in relation to the professional development of teachers. There have been profound changes in global politics, academic knowledge and the moral focus of education and commerce in recent decades. Western society in Europe and the USA since the 1970s has experienced decline in economic growth, political empire and legitimated cultural currency. This loss of national confidence in the ‘West’ and the USA elicited a reaction which created space within academia for reflective and critical discourses, such as critical theory, phenomenology, ethnomethodology, Marxism, existentialism and postmodernism. These themes in academic focus are unified through the perspective of social constructivism, deconstructionism and postmodernism. Within the postmodern perspective society is viewed as a text, and accepted scientific and academic texts are themselves viewed as rhetorical acts with no logical or empirical legitimacy. In such a view, fact and fiction become blurred because they are seen as the products and resources for communicative action - they are representations of a constructed reality representing different ideologies, groups and interests.

What are the implications of this change for teacher education in universities? Ultimately the courses constructed in universities to legitimate teachers' professional practice are facing the tensions which arise from ideological and post-empiricist critique. Traditionally, their development has been based upon academic scholarship and intellectual ability, whereas the practical knowledge and experience gained in teachers' careers have been treated as incidental to this focus, and have even at times been dismissed as ‘subjective’ or anecdotal when used as evidence in written assignments and dissertations.

The focus of this chapter is on the inevitable changes that are occurring in

-146-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Images of Educational Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.