Images, Scandal, and Communication Strategies of the Clinton Presidency

By Robert E. Denton; Rachel L. Holloway | Go to book overview
Save to active project

4
Behind Their Skirts: Clinton and
Women Voters

Mary Christine Banwart and Lynda Lee Kaid

The “gender gap” was one of the most salient concepts of voting behavior in the last decade of the twentieth century. Discussions repeatedly centered on how women had become an important force in the voting equation, candidates were advised to develop appeals specifically for women voters, and female voters were given credit for electing and retaining Bill Clinton as president of the United States. This chapter considers how and why women voters were so important to the presidential electoral landscape between 1992 and 2000.


THE GENDER GAP IN 1992 AND 1996

The “gender gap,” a term coined by former National Organization for Women (NOW) president, Eleanor Smeal, in 1981, gave a label to the phenomenon of differential voting trends among male and female voters (Sigel, 1999). This gender gap was observed in large and small elections for many years, but concern about the “women’s vote” may have reached its peak in the 1990s, a factor some attribute to the aftermath of the HillThomas Hearings, the fateful clash in which Professor Anita Hill accused Supreme Court Justice nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment (Dolan, 1998).

Whatever its antecedents, the fact is that women voters, who now make up the majority of eligible voters in the United States, do make different electoral choices than their male counterparts. In the 1992 presidential

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Images, Scandal, and Communication Strategies of the Clinton Presidency
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?