Principle over Politics? The Domestic Policy of the George H. W. Bush Presidency

By Richard Himelfarb; Rosanna Perotti | Go to book overview

Preface

From April 17 to April 19, 1997, more than 200 scholars,journalists, foreign dignitaries, and alumni of the Bush administration gathered at Hofstra University to discuss the work and times of the George H. W. Bush, the forty-first president of the United States. The conference, titled “The Presidency of George Bush: Leading in a New World,” had been two years in the making. It was the university’s tenth and largest presidential conference. President Bush himself attended, as weIl as his vice president, Dan Quayle, rus wife, former First Lady Barbara Bush, former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, and former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. Members of the Bush cabinet participated, as did dozens of others who served under President Bush.

This book is one of a series of four volumes of proceedings of the conference. Each of the four volumes features the prepared papers of scholars who presented work analyzing the Bush administration. At the conference, these panel papers were then discussed by joumalists who covered the Bush presidency, as well as former officiais of the Bush administration. Like the conference itself, the proceedings featured fascinating exchanges between those of us who observe and analyze the presidency from the vantage point of the academic world and those who make day-to-day political decisions in our national govemment. As the reader will notice, sometimes the exchanges were sharp.

We have organized the proceedings thematically into four volumes. A Noble Calling: Character and the George H. W. Bush Presidency, edited by William F. Levantrosser and Rosanna Perotti, contains chapters and discussions on President Bush’s upbringing, his early career, and his personal style, particularly in the handling of foreign affairs. Honor and Loyalty: Inside the Politics of the George H. W.

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