Principle over Politics? The Domestic Policy of the George H. W. Bush Presidency

By Richard Himelfarb; Rosanna Perotti | Go to book overview

Questions and Answers

James R. Johnson, Moderator: Using my privilege as moderator, I thought maybe I’d like to start with the first question, and we’ll see if the panel wants to follow up, and then we will move directly to audience participation. I think, if you are like me, as you’ve been listening, you may have been taking some notes, and there was a question you might have wanted to ask.

Both Joe and Lucy alluded to something that’s pretty important, I think, on the legislation. We have a legacy established by the ADA, but it sounds like there is unfinished business and some next steps. I wondered if some of the panel members might like to reflect a little bit on what those next steps might be. Joe, perhaps? You started some of that. Or Lucy?

Paul Hearne: Can I make a comment?

Joseph P. Shapiro: Please!

Hearne: Does Joe want to make a comment?

Shapiro: Go ahead, Paul.

Hearne: Well, I was only going to say that what we’re working on right now—and Justin and I are on the board of it, and we’re working hard to get it going—is what’s called the American Association of People with Disabilities, which is kind of like on the AARP model for people with disabilities. And there’s a stated purpose and then there’s a hidden purpose, as I guess everything in Washington has. And the stated purpose is to organize on an across-disability basis across the country people with disabilities to form a force, very similar to what Frank did—I’m sorry to say this, Frank—almost twenty years ago (I was there, too, so we’re both the same age) when he worked on the American—ACCD, or the Coalition of Citizens with Disabilities, the difference being this would be a membership organization which would hopefully organize people with disabilities across the country. The unstated purpose—and this is my, I guess, giving a little editorial on it—is that we create a market by doing that, and generically, whether AAPD works or not, in my view, the next step is consumerism and consumer power based on what people with disabilities as a market of well over 49 million, what they will be able to do. Insurance companies are afraid of us now, but find me an insurance company that will reject doing a long-term program on a group basis for a market of 49 million. Somehow I think they’ll be able to figure out a way to finance it. So I say that two—specifically, AAPD and, less specifically, joining together as a consumer market and a political power to make sure that ADA works on the local level.

Johnson: Any other thoughts on maybe appropriate next steps to further the ADA intent?

-175-

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