Principle over Politics? The Domestic Policy of the George H. W. Bush Presidency

By Richard Himelfarb; Rosanna Perotti | Go to book overview

Panelist Discussion

Robert C. Vogt, Moderator. Maybe it’s useful now for me to give the authors of our papers a chance to respond to some of the panelists, and then turn it over to you, if you have any questions for them to respond to. Professors Jackson and Riddlesperger?

Donald W. Jackson: Very briefly, on the question of whether the Civil Rights Act of 1991 was chiefly a matter of education: If that is the case, one should be able to find the evidence of the consequences of that argument. Our coauthor, Gary Fowler, is a litigator who represents employers in employment discrimination cases; he’s not here today because he’s in court defending an employer. The suggestion that education was the key issue in the Civil Rights Act of 1991 came as a surprise to him. And it came as a surprise to the president of the chief interest group that represents employers in employment discrimination cases, the Employment Policy Foundation. There is no evidence there. The federal cases—there are not many, of course, because it hasn’t been that long since 1991–don’t talk about education. In other words, there’s essentially no evidence whatsoever that the Civil Rights Act of 1991 had anything particularly to do with education.

The consequences of the 1991 Civil Rights Act came from two other sources entirely separate from quotas and education, and they have to do chiefly with the availability of jury trials in employment discrimination cases and the allowance of compensatory and punitive damages capped at $300,000, which allowed all of these people to file suits with greater expectations of being able to recover damages. And so the consequences have been the dramatic increase in the number of cases brought in court, and there appears to be no evidence that anyone that I know of can find that education had anything to do with that at all. One other point–

C. Boyden Gray: If I could just interrupt, I’m sorry. Of course it had. There were two separate issues, always: quotas and damages. They weren’t connected. They never were connected. They aren’t connected now. No one ever said they were connected. And we knew the damages problem was going to be a problem. We knew it was going to be a problem, and we said so, and we predicted it, and it’s happened. Now, that’s different than the other issue. The two are separate. I’m sorry, but they’re separate.

Jackson: Well, I was getting ready to address the education issue. It is clearly wrong to equate a high school diploma and education per se. Most states do not do that. That is why they’ve introduced ability testing and skills testing in verbal skills and quantitative skills; that’s why colleges and universities use other measures of education.

Gray: Because diplomas don’t mean anything.

-236-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Principle over Politics? The Domestic Policy of the George H. W. Bush Presidency
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.