Terrorism and Peacekeeping: New Security Challenges

By Volker C. Franke | Go to book overview

Chapter 10
Squeezing a Balloon: Plan
Colombia and America’s War
on Drugs

VOLKER C. FRANKE AND JUSTIN REED

February 13, 2003, 9:00 AM. The single-engine Cessna 208 landed hard after the pilot reported engine trouble minutes before the plane was scheduled to reach the provincial capital Florencia. The plane was carrying four Americans on contract with the CIA and a Colombian military intelligence officer. The men were photographing Colombia’s southern coca fields for tracking and targeting purposes as part of the Bush administration’s intensifying war on drugs in Latin America. Colombian soldiers, who arrived at the rugged crash site within thirty minutes of the accident, found two of the passengers—one American and the Colombian—shot to death. The other three were missing. The plane was riddled with rounds from an M-60 machine gun, but Colombian investigators claim the gunfire did not cause the crash.

The plane had crashed in a traditional stronghold of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (known by their Spanish acronym FARC), a Marxist-oriented guerilla group classified as a terrorist organization by the State Department. Soon after the crash, the FARC admitted to killing the two observers at the scene and taking the others hostage. The three Americans, the FARC offered, could be exchanged in a broad prisoner swap, however, the Colombian and U.S. governments both refused.1 The guerrilla attack comes as part of a renewed escalation in the violence that has tormented the entire Andean region for more than five decades.

Colombia, the world’s leading producer and distributor of cocaine, provides about 90 percent of the cocaine entering the United States and some two-thirds of the heroin found on the East Coast. In addition to supporting independent traffickers and cartels, the drug trade serves as a major source of funding for the FARC and the National Liberation Army (ELN),

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Terrorism and Peacekeeping: New Security Challenges
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.