Liam Mellows and the Irish Revolution

By C. Desmond Greaves | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The materials used in compiling this biography have been found widely dispersed; in general histories of the revolutionary period; biographies of Mellows’ contemporaries; references in periodicals; reminiscences held privately in manuscript; reports in the press; and above all in personal recollections by his associates.

Those who provided or indicated sources, or gave their valuable time in discussion, are too numerous to acknowledge separately. At the risk of invidiousness I would nevertheless like to thank specially for their help and encouragement, Mrs. Rita Brady, Miss Maire Comerford, Mrs. Nora Connolly-O’Brien, Messrs. R. J. Connolly, Padhraig Fahy, George Fleming, Frank Hynes, Stephen Jordan, Joseph MacHenry, Eamon Martin, Ernest Nunan, Peadar O’Donnell, Cormac O’Malley (who allowed me to examine his father’s papers), Frank Robbins, and Tony Woods (whose mother’s papers are a mine of information); also the late Ailbhe O’Monncain who placed his valuable papers at my disposal, and the late Rev. Norman Thomas. None of these is to the slightest degree responsible for opinions expressed or errors committed.

To these must be added the staffs of the Irish National Museum, National Library, Dublin City Library and Sligo County Library, and that of the British Museum Newspaper Library at Colindale, together with many State and City Libraries in the U.S.A. A special word of appreciation must be said of Mrs. Fiona Connolly-Edwards who prepared the manuscript for the press in a critical manner, making many useful suggestions.

C. D. G.

Birkenhead, March 1971

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