The Intruders: Unreasonable Searches and Seizures from King John to John Ashcroft

By Samuel Dash | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I am greatly indebted to my colleagues at Geotgetown University Law Center— Professors Daniel R. Ernst, James C. Oldham, and Louis Michael Seidman—for reading and editing my manuscript within the areas of their expertise and giving me valuable recommendations for correction and improvement. The historical and legal materials have benefited much from their help. They are not responsible, however, for the positions I take on these matters in this book. In addition, I am thankful to Justice Randy Holland of the Delaware Supreme Court for his many helpful suggestions.

The research for this book took several years and could not have been accomplished without the skillful and committed help of my law student research assistants during this period. I owe special thanks to these gifted former students: Max Bolstad, Stephen Campbell, Pat Casey, Audrey L. Harris, Ann Hart, K. Kathleen Kern, Christopher P. Reid, Manuel S. Varela, and Stacey L. Wruble.

In addition, this was a family project. As always, my wife, Sara, encouraged and inspired me to complete the book, although the work separated us too often. Also she read all the drafts of my manuscript and questioned and aided me constantly on style and structure. Through her guidance, I hope I have been able to translate legal concepts more clearly for the understanding of nonlawyers. My daughter Judi Ellen and her husband, David Molineaux, gifted writers in their own right, provided helpful suggestions for improvement of the writing. Finally, my daughter Rachel, a professor of family therapy and passionate believer in equal justice, added her talents to make the book more readable.

I am grateful to my secretarial assistant, Édeanna Johnson, who edited and put the book together for me in the proper style for publication. Lastly, I thank Marlie Wasserman, director of Rutgers University Press, for believing in me and my book and paving the way for its publication, as well as the staff members of the Press for all their help.

-ix-

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