Beckett and Badiou: The Pathos of Intermittency

By Andrew Gibson | Go to book overview

Index
Abbott, H. Porter 196
Acheson, James 144, 153
Ackerley, C. J. 27, 33 n, 153
Act Without Words I, 239, 242, 251
Act Without Words II, 242
actuality and potentiality 83; in Agamben 277–84; in Aristotle 277–8; in Beckett 285–90
Adorno, Theodor 58 n, 253; on Beckett 4, 204 n, 229, 239 n, 256, 263
affirmation: Agamben’s critique of 284; Badiou’s methods of 38, 105, 114; Beckett’s art as 124; Beckettian critique of 170; modern art as 162–4; philosophy as 1–2, 18, 40, 80
Agamben, Giorgio 18 n, 27, 58, 63 n, 133, 277–84, 289; and constituted power 275–7; and constituting power 275–7; and contemporary politics 275; critique of Badiou 283–4; and sovereign decree 276–7, 280–1, 283
Alembert, Jean Le Rond d’ 64
All That Fall 240, 242
alterity: Badiou’s conception of 134, 168, 201, 203–4; postmodernism and 93–4, 97; as self-evident banality 123
Althusser, Louis 20, 24 n, 97, 283
anabasis 100
anti-philosophers 72; see also Lacan; Paul, Saint; Nietzsche; Wittgenstein
anti-Platonism, modern 44 n, 80
apagogic reason 63, 87–8, 284; Beckett and 88, 137, 144, 155, 189, 194, 224, 234, 244, 285; closeness to irony of 88
aporetics: Beckett and 120, 155, 187, 191–2, 215, 243, 277, 287; Mallarmé and 185; Plato and 44, 206
appearances: Badiou’s conception of 173–81, 184, 220, 237, 273; Beckett’s resistance to 187–90, 195, 196, 197, 221–3, 238–9, 243, 285, 286–7
Arendt, Hannah 1 n, 3
Aristotle 10, 42, 51, 65, 201, 283; concept of infinity of 8, 27, 48; and ethics 198; and mathematika 43; see also actuality and potentiality
art: distinct from other truths 178–9, 183; and impersonality 162–3; modern 1–2, 66, 110, 120, 263–4; as truth-domain 56, 58, 66–7
Ashbery, John 17
Astier, Pierre 248
atheism 7, 50–2, 72
Auden, W.H. 154 n
axiomatization 8, 11, 49
axioms 11, 18, 39, 43, 49, 87, 120, 204 n, 283, 284; Beckett and 124, 133, 149, 152, 188, 216, 245–7, 290; ZF (Zermelo-Fraenkel), 11–12, 47, 65; see also choice; empty set; power set
Balzac, Honoré de 159, 282
Barker, Jason 19 n
Barthes, Roland 80
Bataille, Georges 279; resistance to Hegel in 275
Baudelaire, Charles 199 n, 266, 281
Beach, Sylvia 148
Beckett criticism 131–2; and absurdism 117, 120; and deconstruction 120, 124–5; and existentialism 117–18, 120, 124, 130, 187; and humanism 120, 124, 130; and poststructuralism 118, 133; and theory 118–29
becoming: contemporary romance of 20; in Hegel 274; and potential infinity 10
Beethoven, Ludwig van 102
Begam, Richard 118
Being 21, 41–54, 156; as actual infinity 45–8; Badiou’s conception of 8, 27, 41–54, 136, 173–6, 178–82, 262, 273; Beckett’s conception of 38, 124, 128, 155, 156, 190, 197, 205, 216, 220–3, 237–8, 243, 280, 286–7; completed by the Idea 43, 45, 49; Heidegger’s conception of 42–3; Mallarmé and 185; modern art and 162; play in 40, 75, 204, 229; Sartre’s conception of 22; see also infinity; ontology; penumbra
belonging: in set theory 49, 76; and the State 76–9, 211
Benjamin, Walter 42 n, 166, 168 n, 241, 256, 261, 264–8, 279, 282; and continuous catastrophe 268, 275; and the eternal return 266–8; and infernal time 266–8, 281; and the untimely 267, 281;

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