Citizens More Than Soldiers: The Kentucky Militia and Society in the Early Republic

By Harry S. Laver | Go to book overview

Index
Adair, John: at Battle of New Orleans, 13; and patriotism, 106–7; as political candidate, 91–93, 182n60, 182n63; as subject of toasts, 35
Adams, John, 43, 130
Adams, John Quincy, 80–81
African Americans: being excluded from celebration rituals, 41–42, 101; and first state constitution, 176n16; militia units composed of, 164n47; as percentage of Kentucky's population, 167n60; and social hierarchy, 111–12
Alien and Sedition Acts, 75
Allen County, Kentucky, 133
Armstrong, John, 105
Barrow, Robert H., 100, 184–85n7
Bath County, Kentucky, 57, 115
Beverly, Robert, 115
Blue Licks, Battle of, 11
Boone, Daniel, 44, 56
Bourbon County, Kentucky, 147, 148, 149; economic crisis in, 58–59, 60; iron works in, 57
Bourbon County Committee, 77, 78, 86, 97; and election of 1840, 84; and first state constitution, 71–73; and Mississippi River navigation, 57–58; and second state constitution, 73–74. See also William Henry
Boyd, John P., 35
Boyle County, Kentucky, 135
Bracken County, Kentucky, 84
Bradford, William, 50
Buena Vista, Battle of, 16
Bullitt County, Kentucky, 194n11
Burr, Aaron, 51
Calhoun, John C., 103, 137
celebrations: for Battle of Fallen Timbers, 23; for Battle of New Orleans, 23; for Battle of the Thames, 23; for internal improvements, 37–38; for Kentucky statehood, 32–33; for Lexington Light Infantry anniversary, 37; for Louisiana Purchase, 31, 37; for repeal of taxes, 37. See also July Fourth; Washington's Birthday
Chambers, Frank, 152–53
Chesapeake and Leopard affair, 51–52
Christian County, Kentucky, 81
Cipriani, John, 64
civic virtue: and defense of home, 135; as indication of manhood, 98–99, 103, 137, 139–40; 184n2. See also masculinity
civil disorder: in Clay County, Kentucky, 54–56, 171n20; in Cynthiana, Kentucky, 52; in Frankfort, Kentucky, 53; in Georgetown, Kentucky, 52–53; in Lexington, Kentucky, 50–51; in Limestone, Kentucky, 50; in Manchester, Kentucky, 54–56; in Mason County, Kentucky, 50; in Nicholasville, Kentucky, 53; partisanship leading to, 52–53; in Russellville, Kentucky, 55
Clark, George Rogers, 11, 35
Clark County, Kentucky, 107, 147, 148

-211-

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Citizens More Than Soldiers: The Kentucky Militia and Society in the Early Republic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Rethinking the Social Role of the Militia 1
  • 2 - The Hunters of Kentucky 9
  • 3 - Public Gatherings and Social Order 20
  • 4 - Stability and Security in a Time of Transition 48
  • 5 - Proponents of Democracy and Partisanship 66
  • 6 - A Refuge of Manhood 98
  • 7 - Fighters, Protectprs, and Men 128
  • Conclusion - Citizens More Than Soldiers 144
  • Appendix 147
  • Notes 155
  • Bibliography 199
  • Index 211
  • Studies in War, Society, and the Military 217
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