Martin Luther: The Preservation of the Church, 1532-1546

By Martin Brecht; James L. Schaaf | Go to book overview

II
Luther’s Role in the Reformation’s
Progress in Other German Territories,
the Agreement on
the Lord’s Supper, and the
Relationships with France and England
(1532–36)

As expected, the Reformation in Germany continued to expand after the Religious Peace of Nuremberg of 1532. Luther was frequently involved in this process in various ways. He often assisted in introducing the Reformation into additional territories. Territories and cities that had already become evangelical continued to require his counsel and support. He warned against Anabaptism, which was clearly revealing at that time that it was a danger for church and society. Within the Smalcald League the cities in southern Germany were now drawing nearer to Luther theologically. Even France and England were seeking contacts with Wittenberg. More strongly than before, political interests were affecting these external relationships. Not infrequently, both within and without Electoral Saxony, the joint counsel of the Wittenberg theologians was requested or given, and frequently Melanchthon was assigned the task of formulating their mutual decision.


1. THE REFORMATION IN
THE PRINCIPALITY OF ANHALT

Aside from Electoral Saxony, there was scarcely any other Reformation territory in which Luther was more involved than the one in the principality of Anhalt, which lay to the northwest of Wittenberg.1 As in the two Saxonies, the government there had similarly been divided between two lines of the princely house. Prince Wolfgang (b. 1492) resided in Kothen. Through his mother, Elector John’s sister, he had close connections with the ruling house of Electoral Saxony. He had already joined in signing the Augsburg Confession in 1530. In the Dessau portion of the territory his cousin, Prince John (b. 1504), ruled. Johns brothers were Prince George (b. 1507), the cathedral dean in

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Martin Luther: The Preservation of the Church, 1532-1546
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 511

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.