Great World Writers: Twentieth Century - Vol. 13

By Patrick M. O'neil | Go to book overview

Glossary

absurd: ridiculously unreasonable, unsound, or incongruous; having no rational or orderly relationship to human life; meaningless

aestheticism: a literary and artistic movement that began in nineteenth-century France whose followers believed that art should not be mixed with social, political, or moral teaching

alienation: a withdrawing or separation of a person or a persons affections from a person, an object, or a position of former attachment

allegory: the expression of truths or generalizations about human existence by the use of symbolic fictional figures and actions

alliteration: the repetition of initial consonant sounds in neighboring words

alliterative meter: the distinctive verse form of Old Germanic poetry, including Old English. It employed a long line divided by a caesura (a pause) into two balanced half-lines, each with a given number of stressed syllables and a variable number of unstressed symbols,

antihero: a protagonist or notable figure who is conspicuously lacking in heroic qualities

apartheid: a racial segregation, specifically a policy of segregation and political and economic discrimination against non-European groups in the Republic of South Africa

apologetics: a branch of theology devoted to the defense of the divine origin and authority of Christianity

assonance: the resemblance of sounds in words or syllables by the repetition of vowels without the repetition of consonants; used as an alternate to rhyme in verse

autobiography: a personal account of one’s own life, especially for publication; a biography of oneself narrated by oneself

avant-garde: pioneers or innovators, especially in art and literature, who develop new or experimental concepts

bildungsroman: a novel dealing with one person’s early life and development

blank verse: unrhymed verse; specifically, unrhymed iambic pentameter verse

boom novel (Latin American modernism): a Spanish-American novel written during the movement known as the Boom (which brought Spanish-American literature into the international limelight in the 1960s), which began in 1958 with Carlos Fuentes’s novel Where the Air Is Clear, exploded in 1964 when Mario Vargas Llosa received the Biblioteca Breve Prize for his 1963 novel, The Time of the Hero (the first of five Biblioteca Breve Prizes awarded to LatinAmerican writers in the 1960s), and reached its definitive moment with the publication of Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude in 1967.

cinematic fiction: a novel relating to, suggestive of, or suitable for motion pictures or the filming of motion pictures; a novel filmed and presented as a motion picture

colonialism: control by one power over a dependent area or people

confessional literature: works that are intimately autobiographical

counterpoint: use of contrast or interplay of elements in a work of art in order to set off or emphasize by juxtaposition

creationist movement (literary): a short-lived avant-garde movement whose most vociferous exponent, and possible inventor, was Chilean writer Vicente Huidobro, a prominent figure in the post–World War I literary vanguard in Paris, Madrid, and Chile

demotic language: language derived from or using the language of the common people rather than the more formal style of a priesthood or other educated elite

dialect: a regional variety of language distinguished by features of vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation from other regional varieties

dystopian fiction: works describing an antiutopia, a place where people lead dehumanized and often fearful lives

dystopian novel: an anti-utopian novel where, instead of a paradise, everything has gone wrong in the attempt to create a perfect society

-1740-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Great World Writers: Twentieth Century - Vol. 13
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Writers by Country of Origin 1732
  • Writers by Genre 1734
  • Winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature 1737
  • Glossary 1740
  • Further Reading 1744
  • Index of Literary Works 1747
  • Index of Visual Arts 1771
  • Index of Visual Artists 1775
  • Index of Films 1780
  • Index of Literary Characters 1783
  • Index of People, Places, Movements, and Events 1798
  • Comprehensive Index of Writer 1818
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1848

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.