Scottish Independence and the Idea of Britain: From the Picts to Alexander III

By Dauvit Broun | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgements

Most books by academics these days owe at least their date of publication to the Research Assessment Exercise. This one, however, would not have existed without it. Since the last RAE I have pursued the theme of this book in a number of articles, but without giving any thought to bringing them together. They could not easily be made into a collection of essays because there is too much overlap between a few of them and in others only some parts were relevant to this particular theme. The RAE requires each member of staff to submit four pieces of work, and it dawned on me that this would allow little scope to indicate that I have been working on the subject of this book, especially if berths were to be found for the fruits of other projects. It is difficult to exaggerate the importance of a successful outcome in the RAE for our institutions and for the continuing viability of our disciplines, so there was nothing else for it but to draw the material together so they could find a home together when it came to identifying four items for assessment. In the end, about half of the book consists of repeats of material that has been published since the last RAE. The opportunity has been taken to expand or contract some sections, correct errors, update references and reduce the number of collateral footnotes, so there is no item that has been reproduced exactly as it first appeared. That is not to say that what follows supersedes the originals. In all but two cases (chapters 4 and 7) the original articles have sections on matters beyond the scope of this book: if you want to find out why I have argued that Cinaed mac Ailpín was a Pict, for example, you will need to look up the article from which most of chapter 3 has been derived; or if you wish to read about the kingdom of Strathclyde, you will need to look at the article from which much of chapter 5 has been extracted. I am very grateful to the editors and publishers of the articles reproduced in chapters 3, 4, 5 and 7 for their very ready cooperation in this, particularly Professor Thomas Owen Clancy, Professor John Gillingham, Professor James Kirk, Dr Pamela O'Neill, Caroline Palmer and Professor David Wright. I am particularly grateful to John Davey of EUP for his encouragement of this project from the outset.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Scottish Independence and the Idea of Britain: From the Picts to Alexander III
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.