The Point Is to Change It: Poetry and Criticism in the Continuing Present

By Jerome McGann | Go to book overview

Index
Acker, Kathy, 97, 185, 218; Blood and Guts in High School, 90–91
Adam, Helen, 90
Adorno, Theodore, 144; Aesthetic Theory, 42
Aeschylus, 192, 208; Epigoni, 65
aesthetics of criticism, xii
Ahearn, Barry, 45, 47
“Albany” (Silliman), 62
Alphabet, The (Silliman), 50–53, 57, 58–64, 185; asks every reader to propose own readings, 50–51; “Demo” section, 58–60; as a model for way of succeeding in genre of longpoem, 47–48; order of initial publication, 46; “Oz,” 44, 55, 5657, 62; phenomenological unity, 48–49; poetry as a scene of “investigation,” 48; “processing rules,” 54–55, 62–63; question of the ordering of, 46–49; refusal to allow the privilege of authorial control, 61; Silliman’s claim that the project of “solves” the “problem” of the American longpoem, 51–52; vocabulary of word processing, 51; “voiced comma” between paired units of text, 58–60
Altman, Robert, 218
Alvarez, Alfred, 205
“ambiguity,” 140
American longpoem: The Alphabet (Silliman) as, 47–48, 51–52, 58; history of failures, 48
anacoluthon, 24, 86
Andrews, Bruce: didactic aims, 65; immediacy of work, 75; influence of Brecht upon, 71; instability of texts, 76; “medium of writing,” 77; and objectivism, 67; poetic action dependant upon the selfconscious re-action of the reader, 74; radical level of discourse, 74; resistance against Romantic form, 65–66; “the words absolutely are the poem,” 74, 75–76; ties to Stein, 71–72
Andrews, Bruce, works of: “Confidence Trick,” 66, 73; “Constitution / Writing, Politics, Language, the Body,” 76; Getting Ready to Have Been Frightened, 71, 76–79; I Don’t Have Any Paper So Shut Up (or, Social Romanticism), 75; “Isolate Your Fuse,” 74; “Paradise and Method,” 71; “Poetry as Explanation, Poetry as Praxis,” 68, 70, 71; “Vowels,” 71–72
angelism, 31, 32
Arendt, Hannah, xv
Arnold, Matthew, xiv, xvi, 86, 89, 96, 146, 193

-235-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Point Is to Change It: Poetry and Criticism in the Continuing Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 243

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.