Border Citizens: The Making of Indians, Mexicans, and Anglos in Arizona

By Eric V. Meeks | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER 8
VILLAGES, TRIBES, AND NATIONS

An editorial in the Arizona Daily Star in 1960 proved that old notions about Indians being incapable of full and equal citizenship were alive and well. Pointing to factionalism on the Tohono O'odham reservations, the writer suggested that Anglo-Arizonans, “who have had the job of working with warring Indian Tribes and more recently working with the reservation Indians, should have some idea of what a task it is to change primitive people into modern citizens.” The editorial ignored the considerable factionalism among non-Indians and the fact that recent tensions on the reservations were largely the outgrowth of new and unfamiliar political structures that conflicted with older standards of village autonomy and government by consensus. It continued, “In one hundred years we have been barely able to advance these people to any point beyond tribal self-government.”1

Enos Francisco, the Tohono O'odham tribal chairman, responded to the editorial by turning its argument on its head. He suggested that it was modern white citizens who had trouble understanding anything beyond their own, shortsighted standards of government and citizenship. “Your editorial,” he wrote, “implies that consistent, intelligent efforts have been made over the past century to help Indians achieve a position of social and economic independence and to assume the responsibilities of full citizenship. Anyone with even a slight knowledge of Indian affairs knows how far this is from the truth.” The politics of the Anglo majority from his perspective were at least as contentious and even less comprehensible, he went on. “It can be said more accurately that Indians, and particularly those in Arizona who have had the job of trying to work with warring white groups, and more recently working with the tribes of administrative whites,

-211-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Border Citizens: The Making of Indians, Mexicans, and Anglos in Arizona
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?