FIVE

Myriad and drumming, the feet of sound move always through these crooked streets, trembling the shoddy houses, jerking the skeleton children who scream and laugh so senselessly to uneven rhythms they themselves know not of. Monster trucks shake by, streetcars plunge, machinery rasps and shrieks. Far underneath thinly quiver the human noises—weeping and scolding and tired words that slip out in monosyllables and are as if never spoken; sighs of lust, and guttural, the sigh of weariness; laughter sometimes, but this sound can scarcely be called human, not even in the mouths of children. A fog of stink smothers down over it all—so solid, so impenetrable, no other smell lives beside it. Human smells, crotch and underarm sweat, the smell of cooking or of burning, all are drowned under, merged into the vast unmoving stench.

-67-

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Yonnondio: From the Thirties
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • One 1
  • Two 23
  • Three 33
  • Four 41
  • Five 67
  • Six 115
  • Seven 131
  • Eight 149
  • A Note about This Book 195
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