African American Bioethics: Culture, Race, and Identity

By Lawrence J. Prograis Jr.; Edmund D. Pellegrino | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abu Ghraib prison, 105
affirmative action, 56, 75
African American, as term, 155–56
African American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT) and BiDil, 11, 21n19, 22n30, 84–85, 137, 144–45
African American perspectives on culture and biomedical ethics, ix–xxi, 1–23, 129; and African traditional folkways, xvi–xvii; antimajoritarian and antiutilitarian, 4; antisituationist, 4, 5; benefits for contemporary thought, 6–8; and bioethics discipline, x–xi, xii, xiii; and clinical ethical decision making, xiv–xv, 127–36; and cultural relativism, 2–3, 18–20n18; defining culture, ix–x; and degraded antilife bioethics, 8; development of the current volume, xii–xv; elements that ought to characterize, 4–5; and an “ethics of trust,” 4; ethnoracial issues, 12–15; and families, 4; and Garcia’s standpoint epistemology, x, xiii, 3, 154, 156; and human dignity, 4–5; humanizing influence of, 7–8; implications for other cultural groups, xv–xvii; and individualism, 5–6; methodology of, 1, 2, 58–59; and moral absolutism, xviii–xix; moral norms at work in, 1, 2; moral philosophical questions, xviii–xx; and moral relativism, xviii–xix; and 1992 article/conference, xi–xii, 4–6, 18–21n18; and patient autonomy, 4; and political thought, 4, 6–7, 16n13, 17n14, 129–31; professional moral obligations, xvi–xvii; the promise of, 1–3; and racial concepts in medical research, xv, 8–12, 137–51; and religious faith/ insights, xvii, 4, 6; and scientism, 4; and sociopolitical concerns, xii–xiii; “standpoint epistemology,” x, xiii, 3, 154, 156; topics of, 1, 2; and unique moral claims, 1–2, 18–20n18; and virtue ethics, 3, 154. See also personal narratives of African American medical professionals
African traditional culture: concepts of health, 95; folk healing and legacy of, 95–98; and moral weight of culture in ethics, 26, 34, 35, 39–43; professional moral obligations with regard to, xvi–xvii; Yo r uba customs, 26, 39–40, 42–43
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), 73, 76
Alcoa, 56
Alexander v. Sandoval (2001), 78
American Cancer Society, 54, 60
American Enterprise Institute, 49, 55, 56, 59
An American Health Dilemma: A Medical History of African Americans and the Problem of Race (Byrd and Clayton), 99
American Journal of Public Health, 59
American Medical Association, 49–50
American Petroleum Institute, 56
American Psychological Association, 59
The Apostolic Faith (Azusa Street revival newspaper), 97
Appelbaum, P. S., 118–21
Appiah, Anthony, 8, 155–56
asthma deaths, 48
Audi, Robert, 154
autonomy: and African American bioethical perspectives, 4, 7–8; ethical issue of, 40–41
Avise, J. C., 140
Bad Blood (Jones), 52
Baldwin, James, 113
Ball, R. M., 140
Bamshad, M., 139–41
Banner, William Augustus, 132–35

-161-

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