The Rights of God: Islam, Human Rights, and Comparative Ethics

By Irene Oh | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

A book about conversation and dialogue would not have been possible without many conversations and dialogues. The Rights of God was conceived while I was a graduate student at the University of Virginia, where I had the good fortune of conversing with a number of inspiring scholars and teachers. I thank James Childress, Charles Mathewes, Ann Monius, Aziz Sachedina, and Michael J. Smith especially for their time and commitment. I must also express my gratitude to John Kelsay, who has been a generous and insightful mentor, and to Sohail Hashmi for his guidance and humanity. Liz Bucar, Tal Lewis, Grace Kao, Jonathan Schofer, and Aaron Stalnaker have offered their friendship, knowledge, and support. The Center on Religion and Democracy provided me a year to research and write, as well as an environment that stimulated lively conversations with a wonderful group of young scholars. Notre Dame’s Erasmus Institute also enabled me to work on this manuscript while the work was still in its infancy. Jens Böel at the UNESCO archives in Paris provided valuable assistance in researching early dialogues about human rights. The Irmgard Coninx Foundation and Humboldt Universität provided a forum for discussing shared interests with an international group of human rights scholars and activists. I also thank Dexter Callender, John Fitzgerald, David Graf, Henry Green, David Kling, Michelle Gonzalez Maldonado, Ada Orlando, Ivan Petrella, Jenni Ratner-Rosenhagen, and Stephen Sapp, all at the University of Miami, for their true collegiality. Finally, I am thankful for the daily conversations I have with my husband, James. In acknowledging him for his constant support, I am reminded that there are occasions in life when words are inadequate to express the depths of gratitude.

-vii-

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