The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Origins of the Bible

By Eugene Ulrich | Go to book overview

Preface

For the past two decades, my primary publishing task has been the editing of the Qumran biblical scrolls. The present volume contains a series of essays articulating the lessons I have learned along the way. I was invited by friends and colleagues to write each of them for various conferences and collections, mostly honoring leading figures in the textual study of the Bible.

The essays form a unified picture, each focusing on and attempting to develop particular aspects of the history of the biblical text. They deal first with the Hebrew texts and then with the Greek and Old Latin texts, which help us understand the development of the Hebrew texts. The order of the essays on the Hebrew text moves from the more general to the more specific in scope, although Chapters 3-6 progress in chronological order, following the development of my thought concerning multiple variant editions of the books of Scripture.

The essays on the Greek text follow the ancient chronological progression from the Septuagint as it appears at Qumran, through Josephus’s use of it, its transmission up to Origen, and finally the Hexapla. The Old Latin articles are out of print or virtually inaccessible, and since there is so little research on this highly valuable version, it seemed good to include them here.

I have over the past two decades considered it an academic and collegial obligation something approaching a vocation to produce the critical editions of the Qumran biblical scrolls as expeditiously and responsibly as possible. As is evident from my work on 4QSama and 4QSamc, there is a great deal more that can and should be done on each of the scrolls beyond what routinely appears in the editions in Discoveries in the Judaean Desert. But for the full collection of the biblical scrolls to be edited within a reasonable period, the task

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Origins of the Bible
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 309

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.