Artists in Ohio, 1787-1900: A Biographical Dictionary

By Mary Sayre Haverstock; Jeannette Mahoney Vance et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction

Jeffrey Weidman

Artists in Ohio, 1787–1900 is intended to remedy an old deficiency and address a new need. The need has been created by an increase in academic and popular interest in the art and material culture of the enormous regions that once lay beyond the geographical boundaries of traditional American art research. These hitherto unexplored regions are today being rediscovered and reevaluated not only for their contributions to the cultural life of the nation as a whole, but also as rich fields of study in and of themselves. High among any list of candidates for reappraisal is the state of Ohio, which is old enough to have shared with New England many an itinerant limner, and young enough to have been ripe for the experimentalism that swept America in the late 1800s.

As William H. Gerdts has observed in his monumental and seminal three-volume magnum opus, Art Across America: Two Centuries of Regional Painting in America, 1710–1920:

Of all the states between the East and West
coasts, it was Ohio that developed the great-
est and most continuous artistic tradition.
Even though Chicago had become the ar-
tistic center of the American heartland
by the end of the nineteenth century and
in some ways rivaled the Eastern metro-
polises, Ohio's achievements had greater
longevity, and the work of Ohio artists had,
on the whole, a greater national impact.
No Chicago painter of the period made a na-
tional impression equal to those of Cincin-
nati's Frank Duveneck, John Twachtman,
or Kenyon Cox, nor did any Chicago paint-
er create an icon as powerful as The Spirit
of '76
by Cleveland's Archibald Willard.
(2:179)

Until now, the only published book-length survey of Ohio artists has been Edna Maria Clark's Ohio Art and Artists, printed nearly seventy years ago. The biographical section of Clark's book, compressed into sixty-seven pages, attempted to chronicle the lives and careers of some 850 artists. The entries were very brief, seldom exceeding sixty or seventy words, but were considered adequate in an era when the birthdates of living female subjects were routinely withheld from publication and when scholarly interest in Ohio artists was virtually nonexistent.

Still, as Dr. Gerdts points out, Clark's work is generally recognized as one of "the finest, most complete" historical/biographical studies published before the mid-1930s in America (1:12), but because it has stood unchallenged for so long, the information contained therein has been repeated over and over in later works—often verbatim—and thus our only extant single source of biographical data has been preserved and perpetuated intact, relatively untouched and unexamined for more than five decades, until work began in 1985 on Artists in Ohio, 1787–1900.

Good biographical surveys and dictionaries are useful to all art researchers: they summarize what is known about an artist, they indicate (or should indicate) what is yet to be

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Artists in Ohio, 1787-1900: A Biographical Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1066

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.