Artists in Ohio, 1787-1900: A Biographical Dictionary

By Mary Sayre Haverstock; Jeannette Mahoney Vance et al. | Go to book overview

About the Entries
Though the entries in this dictionary vary greatly in length according to the availability of information, they are all essentially the same in format: Each one begins with a narrative and ends with a list of references.The typical narrative consists of the artist's name and vital statistics, followed by a biographical sketch including his or her artistic specialties, family background, education, places of residence, exhibition history, and sometimes a contemporary description or appraisal. Cross-references, in SMALL CAPITALS, point to other entries related to the artist's personal and professional relationships.With some exceptions, each artist is listed under the full name bestowed at birth, and all maiden or married names, nicknames, pseudonyms, anglicized surnames, and other variants are entered as cross-references throughout the text. In complex cases, the main entry will be found under the name by which the artist was best known prior to 1901.When an artist is listed by surname only, or surname and initials, but is known to have been female, the appropriate qualifier, "Miss" or "Mrs.," is supplied in brackets as an aid to further research. For example, according to nineteenth-century practice, a woman calling herself "Mrs. J. H. Jones" was in all likelihood using her husband's initials, not her own.Dates of birth and death (when verified in such reliable sources as obituaries, cemetery records, military rosters, and passport applications) are given in parentheses after the artist's name. Unverifiable, incomplete, or conflicting dates from census returns and elsewhere are given later in the narrative.The first time an Ohio place name is mentioned within an entry, its present county location is supplied within parentheses, as in: "Springfield (Clark)." These designations can be important guides for the researcher, for it is often in the eighty-eight individual counties, particularly in the county seats, that the most detailed nineteenth-century records are to be found. An excellent aid to local research is Carol Willsey Bell's Ohio Guide to Genealogical Sources (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1988).Each list of references begins with Ohio sources. These sources are cited in full under the appropriate county headings in the Ohio Bibliography. The Ohio references are listed in the following order:
1). State directories ("Ohio dir. 1872").
2). City, county, and regional directories and atlases ("Springfield dir. 1880; Summit Co. dir. 1883; Crawford Co. atlas 1876").
3). Federal Population Census records, listed by county, year, and National Archives microfilm number ([Erie Co. census 1860 "#958]")
4). State, regional, county, city, and town histories ("Pickaway Co. hist. 1906").
5). Ohio newspapers ("Cleveland Daily True Democrat, Apr. 18, Oct. 17, 1849"). National newspapers, if any, are cited thereafter.

The remainder of the list of references is devoted to general sources: encyclopedias, biographical dictionaries, collected exhibition

-xiii-

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