Artists in Ohio, 1787-1900: A Biographical Dictionary

By Mary Sayre Haverstock; Jeannette Mahoney Vance et al. | Go to book overview

Appendix
Principal Art Schools,
Organizations, Expositions,
and Collaborative Works
Mentioned in the Text

Cross-references in SMALL CAPITALS refer to entries in the text; those in italics refer to other entries in this appendix.

Art Academy of Cincinnati.See McMicken School of Drawing and Design and NOBLE, THOMAS SATTERWHITE.

Artists' Union of Cincinnati. Organized in March 1851, to supplant the moribund Western Art Union, the Artists' Union of Cincinnati opened its first exhibition two months later in THOMAS FARIS'S Melodeon Hall daguerreotype gallery; among those represented were LILLY M. SPENCER, WILLIAM L. SONNTAG. VICTORM. GRISWOLD. GEORGEW. WHITE, EMIL BOTT, JAMES P. BARTON, JOHN R. JOHNSTON, CHARLES E. CRIDLAND, and JOHN F. FRANCIS. Beginning in May 1851, members received a monthly magazine, The Artists'Journal, edited by OSGOOD MUSSEY. A formal constitution was adopted in November, and JAMES H. BEARD was elected president. By January 1852, when the first distribution of paintings was held, there were 1, 335 subscribers. The second took place in January 1853, but by then the membership had dropped to 935; no further distributions were noted in the press. Cincinnati Enquirer, May 8, July 24, Nov. 26, Dec. 21, 1851, Jan. 6, 1852, Jan. 5, 1853.

Associated Artists of Cincinnati. A group of artists and amateurs who banded together in 1866 to provide "the means for a more thorough knowledge of Art," to establish an art school, and "to make Cincinnati—what it should be—the Artcenter of the Great West." With CHARLES T. WEBBER as president, on December 27, 1866, the Associated Artists held its first "Annual Exhibition and Conversazione" at WILLIAM WISWELL JR.'S Gallery with works by THOMAS D. JONES, WILLIAM P. NOBLE, HENRY MOSLER, and others. The organization was absorbed in 1868 by the Cincinnati Academy of Fine Arts. Cincinnati Enquirer, Dec. 17, 25, 1866, Feb. 19, Mar. 11, 20, 1867; Vitz 1967 (thesis), 14–15.

Brush and Palette Club of Cleveland. A select society of professional artists organized in 1893 for the purpose of holding semi-annual exhibitions, and for "theadvancement of professional art." The first president was ARCHIBALD M. WILLARD, and the founding members were MAX BOHM, CHARLES DE KLYN, FREDERICK C. GOTTWALD (secretarytreasurer), JOHN KAVANAGH, ADAM LEHR, O. v. SCHUBERT, and JOHN SEMON. In 1895 Charles F. Olney, a Cleveland art critic and collector, became president and three more members were admitted: WILLIAM J. EDMONDSON, NINA V. WALDECK, and CAROLINE M. OSBORN. Cleveland Plain Dealer, May 20, Nov. 11, 1894, May 19, Nov. 10, 1895, Dec. 8, 1896, Nov. 13, 1898, Apr. 30 (illus.), 1899; Am. Art Ann. 2 (1899); Van Tassel and Grabowski 1987.

Cincinnati Academy of Fine Arts "1827". See ECKSTEIN, FREDERICK.

Cincinnati Academy of Fine Arts "1838". Formed October 18, 1838, by "a few young men of Cincinnati, in order that by their union they might obtain greater facilities for the mutual improvement of the members "in" the various branches of the fine arts." This was the second of three quite different organizations of the same name launched in Cincinnati between 1827 and 1868. Among its founders were JAMES H. BEARD, GODFREY FRANKENSTEIN (president), WORTHINGTON WHITTREDGE, MINER K. KELLOGG, and JOHN L. WHETSTONE (secretary). To raise funds, in 1839 they held an exhibition of 150 works of painting and sculpture, loaned by the members themselves and by sympathetic local collectors like PEYTON S. SYMMES. Determined to perpetuate their cause, the members mounted a second exhibition in 1841, but they were in reality working at cross-purposes with the Fine Arts Section of the Society for the Promotion of Useful Knowledge; the Academy lasted

-981-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Artists in Ohio, 1787-1900: A Biographical Dictionary
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1066

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.