Athens in Paris: Ancient Greece and the Political in Postwar French Thought

By Miriam Leonard | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The completion of this book was made possible by a grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC’s) research leave scheme. I am extremely grateful to them and to the Bristol Department of Classics and Ancient History for giving me the time to finish this manuscript. Much of the writing was completed while I was a Scholar in Residence at Duke University in 2003–4, many thanks to the departments of Classical Studies and the Literature Program and to Peter Burian, in particular, for being such welcoming hosts. I must also thank the Faculty of Classics and Newnham College, Cambridge for their generosity both financial and intellectual.

It is a great pleasure to thank the many friends and colleagues who have helped me with this book. I am grateful to Geoffrey Lloyd and to François Hartog who examined my Ph.D. thesis and to Malcolm Schofield and John Henderson who provided exacting criticism and support while I was at Cambridge. Mary Beard and Helen Morales, in particular, have been most generous with their wisdom. Franc¸ois Hartog and Jesper Svenbro offered invaluable advice and José-Otavio Nogueira-Guimaraes gave me ample guidance and companionship while I was at the École des Hautes Études in Paris. I was also greatly helped by discussions with Jacques Derrida and Pierre Vidal-Naquet. Thanks also to Christopher Stray, Simon Critchley, and John Forrester for their help at the outset of this project. I am exceptionally fortunate to work in a department where the dialogue between antiquity and modernity is being so vigorously debated and theorized. I learnt a great deal from the students who followed my MA unit on the reception of the Antigone. My colleagues Duncan Kennedy, Ellen O’Gorman, and Vanda Zajko provide daily stimulation: I cannot imagine a more challenging intellectual environment for studying the reception of the classical world. Aleka Lianeri has transformed my thinking on so many issues and continues to be a constant source of intellectual companionship. I have also benefited enormously from support and advice from my friends Aude Doody, Katie Fleming, Annelise

-vii-

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