Psychological Aesthetics: Painting, Feeling, and Making Sense

By David Maclagan | Go to book overview

Subject Index
Abstract art
as disembodied 54
and ‘libidinal loss’ 68
and ‘pure psychic qualities’ (Prinzhorn) 29
as purer form of aesthetic 39
Aesthetics
abstract connotations of 9, 18
death of 129
history of 21–5, 132
Jung and the ‘aesthetic attitude’ 27–8, 84
and object-relations 56
origin of ‘aesthetic’ 22
of pathologising 78
and psychoanalysis 25–6
psychological perspective on 23
and psychopathology in art 76–7
renewal of 141
and secondary revision 65, 102
Aesthetic experience (see also Embodiment)
collective aspects of 18
distortion of in films of artists 92
and ‘madness’ 43
non-verbal aspects of 131
objective aspect of 20, 34
and perception 10, 72
and pleasure in looking 47
psychological aspects of in art therapy 88
psychological resonances of 36, 116
subjective nature of 11
subliminal nature of 8
varieties of 130
Anality
and aesthetic improvement 65–6
and the nature of paint 54
and sublimation 54–5
Archetypal
emphasis in image 75
perspective on art therapy 88
symbolism, iconographic aspect of 51, 75
Art therapy
in art-making itself 67
Jung’s influence on 85–6
‘clinification’ of 89
and psychiatry 87
and psychoanalysis 81–3
Romantic origins of 25
and the world of art 87, 89–90
Art history
language of 18, 114, 125
new developments in 141–2
Beauty
associated with aesthetic 132
complementary to the ugly 70
inherent in world 71
in Kant’s aesthetics 22
modern redefinitions of 9, 129–30
re-emergence of 134–5
Colour
elusive nature of 140
writing on 143 (n.8)
Communication
conventional concept of 8, 21, 130
and mystery in art 83
in psychoanalysis 37
as ‘resonance’ 40
Creative
process according to
Ehrenzweig 63–4
reception of painting 8, 113, 114
Decadence
and aestheticism 25
scientific accounts of 10
Description
in art history 114
attentive to aesthetic qualities 118
justice of 116
overlap with interpretation 113, 118
‘Disfiguring’
Taylor’s concept of 135
Doodle (see also Scribble)
in art therapy 93
as non iconographic form 51–3

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