Hybridity, or the Cultural Logic of Globalization

By Marwan M. Kraidy | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

MANY PEOPLE have contributed to this book. Sandra Braman’s guidance was instrumental since the book’s early stages. John Downing’s thorough read of the entire manuscript rescued me from many traps, and Tom Nakayama’s encouragement to write a bolder conclusion was critical. Other reviewers for Temple University Press offered a healthy balance of support and skepticism. Patrick Murphy and Raúl Tovares have offered friendship and critical commentary.

For encouragement at crucial stages and for general scholarly counsel, I am grateful to Pat Aufderheide, Michael Beard, Douglas Boyd, Dennis Davis, Larry Grossberg, Drew McDaniel, Toby Miller, Christine Ogan, Lana Rakow, and Josep Rota. I am thankful to Joseph Straubhaar for many edifying chats on cultural hybridity, and to Joe Khalil, Nabil Dajani, and Dima Dabbous-Sensenig for instructive conversations on Arab media and cultures. I am also indebted to all those who generously entrusted me with their feelings and thoughts during my fieldwork in Lebanon.

For inviting me to share portions of the book early on, I thank Radha Hegde at New York University, Hemant Shah at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Karla Malette at the American University of Beirut, Ramez Maluf at the Lebanese American University, Richard Harvey Brown at the University of Maryland, Henry Jenkins and David Thorburn at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Georgette Wang at Hong Kong Baptist University. I also thank the Senate Scholarly Activities Committee at the University of North Dakota for inviting me to give a Faculty Lecture at the North Dakota Museum of Art, and Jim Mittleman for inviting me to present a summary of the book to the Council for Comparative Studies at American University. Students in my Communication, Culture, and Globalization graduate colloquium at the University of North Dakota and in my Globalization and Culture seminar and Cultural Dimensions of International Politics graduate course at American University have been generous with ideas and comments. Some material in Chapter Four first appeared in “Hybridity in Cultural Globalization” (Communication Theory 12[3], pp. 316–339, 2002),

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hybridity, or the Cultural Logic of Globalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1- Cultural Hybridity and International Communication 1
  • 2- Scenarios of Global Culture 15
  • 3- The Trails and Tales of Hybridity 45
  • 4- Corporate Transculturalism 72
  • 5- The Cultural and Political Economies of Hybrid Media Texts 97
  • 6- Structure, Reception, and Identity on Arab-Western Dialogism 116
  • 7- Hybridity without Guarantees toward Critical Transculturalism 148
  • Notes 163
  • Bibliography 177
  • Index 211
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.