Charitable Choice at Work: Evaluating Faith-Based Job Programs in the States

By Sheila Suess Kennedy; Wolfgang Bielefeld | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book is the culmination of nearly five years of preparation, research, and writing. It would not have been possible without the generous support and assistance of many people and institutions. The Ford Foundation provided major funding for the research. The Joyce Foundation; the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University– Purdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI); and the Family and So- cial Services Administration of the State of Indiana all provided important seed money. The research was conducted under the aus- pices of IUPUI’s Center for Urban Policy and the Environment (hereafter “the Center”), where we are faculty fellows. The Center’s resources, support staff, and collegial environment were enormously helpful.

It is impossible to overstate the contribution of the colleagues whose research informs this book, beginning with the Charitable Choice Project research team: Laura S. Jensen, associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst; Edward L. Queen, formerly at the Center for Philanthropy and now at Emory University; Partha Deb, formerly a faculty member at IUPUI and currently associate professor of economics at Hunter College of the City University of New York; Rachel Thelin, staff researcher at the Center; Laura Littlepage and Drew Klacick, also at the Center, and Dana Jones, the graduate assistant who spent a year and a half as the project’s liaison with the Indiana Manpower Placement and Comprehensive Training program. Charitable Choice and its various progeny—including most significantly the President’s Faith-Based Initiative—implicate a number of substan- tive scholarly areas, and any analysis, any effort to understand the policy’s impact, requires a wide variety of scholarly perspectives and skills. Without that variety and the insights they provided, this book would never have been written.

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