Charitable Choice at Work: Evaluating Faith-Based Job Programs in the States

By Sheila Suess Kennedy; Wolfgang Bielefeld | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Asking the Right Questions

AS CHAPTER 1 DETAILED, CHARITABLE CHOICE LEGISLATION RAISED MANY MORE theoretical, legal, and policy issues than one research project could address. All legislative proposals—indeed, all programmatic or pol- icy responses to perceived problems, whether public or private— are based upon multiple assumptions: about the nature and ex- tent of the problem to be solved, about the choice and feasibility of appropriate or desirable solutions to the problem, and about the best way to implement the solutions selected. (Different lawmakers will also have different reasons for supporting or opposing par- ticular policies; at times, as we have noted, those motives may have more to do with political or ideological predispositions than with policy considerations.) In that sense, at least, Charitable Choice legislation was business as usual.

Section 104 of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportu- nity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) grew out of a number of beliefs—some articulated, some implicit—about the causes of poverty, the effects of welfare dependence, the presumed efficacy of interventions that incorporate religious elements and values, and the reasons for government’s historic preference for larger, more professionalized contracting partners, whether religious or secular. Among those assumptions was the belief that faith-based organizations (FBOs) do a better job at lower cost; a conviction that a significant number of FBOs would act on a desire to par- ticipate in government welfare programs but for the existence of ”unnecessary and burdensome” institutional barriers; and a belief that FBOs had been discriminated against by public managers ex- cessively concerned with First Amendment issues. In an analysis of press releases and statements issued by the Bush administra- tion, one researcher identified several other assumptions as well:

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charitable Choice at Work: Evaluating Faith-Based Job Programs in the States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.