Participatory Research and Development for Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management: A Sourcebook - Vol. 3

By Julian Gonsalves; Thomas Becker et al. | Go to book overview

65
Supporting Campesino
Experimentation on Livestock:
An
Example from South East Mexico

Campensio households in in SE Mexico, as elsewhere in Latin America, face situations of declining food security due to the disintegration of traditional agriculture, or poor natural resource management (NRM) in colonized areas. The main livelihood activities of these households include crop and livestock production (mainly poultry and pigs) for subsistence and sale. Such marginalized agriculture depends largely upon processes of innovation to overcome constraints.

The project described here sought to overcome both product (i.e., improved livestock feeding systems) and process (i.e., facilitating and strengthening local capacity in campesino experimentation and diffusion) constraints. Actions by campesino groups, nongovernment organizations (NGOs) and researchers have been concerted in this process. The project involved campesino households of four villages--Mahas, Xohuayan X’culoc and Sahcabchen--in the states of Yucatan and Campeche. The objective of the project was to optimize campesino livestock rearing so that household livelihood and food security were improved. Processes of campesino experimentation were facilitated. Animal science research supported campesino innovations. The results of these linked activities were disseminated by using campesino-to-campesino methods.

Campesinos are people in
Latin America who are
involved in agriculture for
both subsistence and
commercial reasons. Crop
and livestock husbandry is
central to the campesino
culture and well-being.

-72-

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