The Government Taketh Away: The Politics of Pain in the United States and Canada

By Leslie A. Pal; R. Kent Weaver | Go to book overview
Save to active project

3
CONTROLLING HEALTH CARE
COSTS FOR THE AGED

CAROLYN HUGHES TUOHY

OVER THE COURSE OF THE 1980s AND 1990s, GOVERNMENTS IN Canada and the U.S. adopted a number of measures directed at holding down the rate of increase in health care costs borne by the public treasury. In both countries, these measures focused primarily on controlling payments to providers rather than reducing eligibility or scope of coverage. The two countries’ rates of increase in nominal health care expenditures in both public and private sectors had paralleled each other at double-digit values in the 1980s. In the 1990s the rates of increase began to slow in both countries and both sectors. But interestingly, the pattern of change in public and private finance diverged in this period. In Canada, the rate of increase in public spending was sharply constrained. As for private finance, however, although the rate of increase declined, it more than kept pace with general inflation. In the U.S., just the reverse was true: Public expenditure was constrained less tightly than was private expenditure. Toward the end of the decade, however, both public and private spending rebounded in both countries, and rates of increase began to converge.

While the restraint measures undertaken by public payers in the 1990s had effects on the availability of health care services, they were targeted in the first instance at providers. Because health care providers—particularly physicians and hospitals—are hardly without political resources, these instances of loss imposition beg to be explained. Indeed, the health care arenas of Canada and the U.S., densely populated with interests and accounting for a substantial proportion of public budgets, provide fertile ground for an exploration of the politics of loss

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Government Taketh Away: The Politics of Pain in the United States and Canada
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 341

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?