Chasing the Wind: Regulating Air Pollution in the Common Law State

By Noga Morag-Levine | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I AM GRATEFUL for the generous financial assistance provided at various stages in this book’s development by the National Science Foundation (Dissertation Improvement Grant); University of California Chancellor’s Dissertation-Year Fellowship; Rackham School of Graduate Studies Research Fellowship; and the University of Michigan Career Development Fund. I would also like to thank the Law and Society Association for permission to incorporate material from my article, “Between Choice and Sacrifice: Constructions of Community Consent in Reactive Air Pollution Regulation” Law & Society Rev. 28 (1994): pp. 1035–77, into chapters 7 and 8. Many of the ideas presented here benefited from the feedback of engaged colleagues at professional forums, including a number of panels at meetings of the Law and Society Association and the American Political Science Association, the Michigan Law School Faculty Workshop, and the Center for the Study of Law and Society at the University of California, Berkeley. In making final revisions I benefited greatly from the comments of the two anonymous reviewers. Many thanks for excellent help with all steps of the publication process are due to Chuck Myers and Mark Bellis of Princeton University Press. I am also grateful to Linda Truilo for her careful and expert editing, and her helpful manner.

From this project’s tentative first steps to the book’s penultimate draft, Bob Kagan provided just the right mix of warm encouragement, critique, and advice. One could not ask for a more engaged and kind guide. I first got hooked on doing interdisciplinary work on law as an undergraduate in Malcolm Feeley’s “Courts and Social Policy” class. Malcolm’s intellectual energy and his steady support and mentorship have enriched my career from those undergraduate days, through graduate school, and beyond. Among my other teachers at Berkeley I owe special thanks to John Dwyer, Judith Gruber, David Lieberman, Robert Post, Harry Scheiber, Martin Shapiro, and Jeremy Waldron. I also want to acknowledge the unique interdisciplinary space provided by the Jurisprudence and Social Policy program at Berkeley and the license it offered for inquiry that does not fit squarely within a single research niche.

I am thankful for the cooperation and assistance provided by the four air pollution agencies under whose jurisdiction the air pollution disputes that I studied occurred. Particular mention must go to Kenneth Manaster, the former chair of the BAAQMD hearing board, whose insights and candor were a window to understanding the contradictory mandates of contemporary air quality enforcement.

-xiii-

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