The Theory of Incentives: The Principal-Agent Model

By Jean-Jacques Laffont; David Martimort | Go to book overview
Save to active project

2
The Rent
Extraction-Efficiency
Trade-Off

Incentive problems arise when a principal wants to delegate a task to an agent. Delegation can be motivated either by the possibility of benefitting from some increasing returns associated with the division of tasks, which is at the root of economic progress, or by the principal’s lack of time or lack of any ability to perform the task himself, or by any other form of the principal’s bounded rationality when facing complex problems. However, by the mere fact of this delegation, the agent may get access to information that is not available to the principal. The exact opportunity cost of this task, the precise technology used, and how good the matching is between the agent’s intrinsic ability and this technology are all examples of pieces of information that may become private knowledge of the agent. In such cases, we will say that there is adverse selection.1

1It is sometimes said that there is hidden knowledge, probably a better expression for describing this situation of asymmetric information. Adverse selection is rather a possible consequence of this

-28-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Theory of Incentives: The Principal-Agent Model
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 421

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?