Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History

By Alice O'connor | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
The Poverty Research Industry

THE POLARIZED debates of the late 1960s may have tarnished the reputation of academic social science, but they did not impede the steady expansion of federally funded poverty research over the next decade and a half. From 1965 to 1980, federal funding for poverty research rose from nearly $3 million to just under $200 million, most designated for the “applied” purposes of mea- surement, program evaluation, and policy analysis.1 Federal research dollars also underwrote the development of new and elaborate methodologies for car- rying out these tasks, leaving poverty research with a sophisticated array of survey, experimental, and modeling techniques that were virtually unmatched in any other field of social research.2 Nor, despite Richard M. Nixon’s avowed determination to dismantle the War on Poverty, did government demand for analytic poverty knowledge show signs of slowing down. Amidst the economic stagnation, unemployment, and inflation that plagued the 1970s, social spend- ing rose steadily—particularly for social insurance and “in-kind” transfer pro- grams such as Food Stamps—and with it the demand for better numbers on who was being served, how, and how efficiently.3

Feeding the federal demand for social knowledge was a corresponding “ex- plosion” in the field of policy analysis, heralded by the creation of formal professional associations, specialized journals, and, especially, the rapid expansion of graduate training programs at major universities nationwide. “Policy sciences” represented a “new study field,” announced the New York Times in 1970, citing the founding of new graduate programs and a journal by that name. The field, like the academic curriculum, was more and more based on “the problem-solving, decision-making, and forecasting techniques pio- neered by the nation’s ‘think tank’ research institutions,” noted the Times.4 It was also very much tied to the increased emphasis on rational planning, budgeting, and evaluation within government bureaucracies, and to the atten- dant, rapidly growing market for government contract research. So, too, paradoxically, did policy analysis stand to benefit from growing skepticism about government institutions in the 1970s, which generated efforts to remodel government bureaucracies for greater administrative efficiency while also in- tensifying competition among existing bureaucratic players to develop their own independent sources of analysis.5 By the end of the decade, the field was sufficiently well established to have generated a budding literature of contra-analytic critique: Policy analysis would “speak truth to power,” to cite

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 375

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.