Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History

By Alice O'connor | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Daniel T. Rodgers, Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age (Cam- bridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1998).

2. As noted in chapter 9, the “causes, consequences, and cures” formulation is very much a product of the War on Poverty, conveying as it does the notion that poverty could be routed out with the help of applied research.

3. Peter Edelman, “The Worst Thing Bill Clinton Has Done,”The Atlantic Monthly, March 1997, 43–58.

4. Laurence Lynn, “Ending Welfare Reform As We Know It,”The American Pros- pect, Fall 1993, 83–92.

5. Charles Murray, Losing Ground: American Social Policy, 1950–1980 (New York: Basic Books, 1984).

6. For a discussion of the connection between the “new liberalism” and social inves- tigation, see Michael J. Lacey and Mary O. Furner, “Social Investigation, Social Knowl- edge, and the State: An Introduction,” in Michael J. Lacey and Mary O. Furner, eds., The State and Social Investigation in Britain and the United States (New York: Cam- bridge University Press, 1993), 3–62.

7. David Callahan, “State Think Tanks on the Move,”The Nation, October 12, 1998, 15–19.

8. The notion that poverty exists as a “paradox” in the land of plenty was not itself new or unique to the 1960s. In earlier, and especially in Progressive Era renditions, however, the “paradox” was a way of drawing attention to the maldistribution of wealth or some other systemic flaw attributable to unregulated capitalism, rather than a way of drawing attention to the anomalous, pitiable status of the poor. See, for a particularly influential statement of the poverty paradox, Henry George, Progress and Poverty, Fifti- eth Anniversary Edition (New York: Robert Schalkenbach Foundation, 1948).


Chapter 1
Origins

1. Daniel T. Rodgers, Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age (Cam- bridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1998).

2. On the challenge to laissez-faire in the early years of professional social science, see Dorothy Ross, The Origins of American Social Science (New York: Cambridge, 1991), 53–140; Mary O. Furner, Advocacy and Objectivity: A Crisis in the Professional- ization of American Social Science, 1865–1905 (Lexington: University Press of Ken- tucky, 1975); Thomas L. Haskell, The Emergence of Professional Social Science: The American Social Science Association and the Nineteenth-Century Crisis of Authority (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1977); and William Leach, True Love and Perfect Union: The Feminist Reform of Sex and Society (New York: Basic Books, 1980), 297– 300.

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