Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History

By Alice O'connor | Go to book overview

Index
A. Philip Randolph Institute, 275
Aaron, Henry, 238
Abbott, Edith, 42, 47, 51
ACE (American Council on Education), 65, 83, 87, 98, 180
achievement motivation tests, 110–11, 115, 116, 121
The Achieving Society (McClelland), 116, 117
Adams, Henry Carter, 25
Addams, Jane, 29, 30, 31, 32, 42, 43, 47
Adorno, Theodor, 106
AEI (American Enterprise Institute), 250, 255; welfare “consensus” and, 256–57
AFDC (Aid to Families with Dependent Children): call for reduced social work by, 177– 78; declining rates of, 248; divide and conquer strategy and, 256; family cap reducing benefits of, 290; New Jersey experiment with, 222–26; research on participants in, 183; rising rates of, 205; single mothers reliance on, 102; struggle over, 57; transitional assistance replacement of, 288; WIN program and, 222, 234. See also welfare
The Affluent Society (Galbraith), 146, 151
African Americans. See blacks
After Freedom (Powdermaker), 76
AID (U.S. Agency for International Development), 114
Alexander, Will, 70
Alinsky, Saul, 53, 126, 134, 171
All Our Kin (Stack), 269
American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 196
An American Dilemma (Myrdal), 10, 76, 94, 96, 97, 98, 307n.2
American Economic Association, 25
American Journal of Sociology, 38, 85, 88
American Sociological Association, 272
American Sociological Society, 69
The American Soldier (Social Science Research Council), 105, 106
Americanization process, Chicago-school on, 46, 47
analytic research: community action research and, 166–67, 186–88, 189–90; by PPBS, 174–75; rise of “policy sciences” and, 213– 15; transformation of poverty knowledge and, 166–67, 173–95, 240. See also OEO’s Research, Plans, Programs and Evaluation (RPP&E); poverty research industry
anthropology. See social anthropology
Appalachian poverty, 147
Area Redevelopment Act of 1961, 139, 149
Area Studies, 113
ASPE (Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation) [HEW/HHS], 175, 194, 226– 27, 229, 235, 237, 238, 242, 251, 285, 291
Atlantic magazine, 267
Auletta, Ken, 237, 267
The Authoritarian Personality (Adorno), 106, 110
Back of the Yards Neighborhood Council, 53, 134
Bakke, E. Wight, 19, 55, 66, 67, 108
Bane, Mary Jo, 252, 253, 285, 288
Banfield, Edward, 115, 209
Becker, Gary, 141
behavioral sciences revolution: global poverty and Cold War impact on, 113–17; political influence on, 105–6; postwar poverty knowledge and, 102–4. See also social sciences
Behind Ghetto Walls (Rainwater), 201
Benedict, Ruth, 114, 118
Beyond Entitlement (Mead), 252
“Bigger Thomas,” 90
biological racism, culture concept as challenge to, 19–20
Black Belt, 91–92
black culture: African roots of, 85; conflicting characterization of, 77; slavery and destruction of African, 78; stripped away by slavery, 83. See also culture
black economic advancement programs, principles of, 96
black family: feminist interpretation of, 269– 70; impact of emancipation on, 83; impact of slavery on, 81, 83, 199–200; matriarchal structure of, 78, 81, 86, 111–13, 199–200; Moynihan Report (1965) on, 21, 172, 196,

-359-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 375

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.