Uncommon Americans: The Lives and Legacies of Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover

By Timothy Walch | Go to book overview

Orphan Boy:
Herbert Hoover and Children

Richard Norton Smith and Timothy Walch

In the bleak, intemperate spring of 1932, the president of the United States found three children on his doorstep. Their father was an unemployed laborer from Detroit, arrested on a charge of auto theft while en route home from a job-hunting trip out west. Soon after, this trio of unhappy youngsters set off for the nation’s capital, believing the man in the White House was possessed of unlimited powers. They were determined to lay their case before him.

The president’s advisors thought him far too busy to hear such an appeal. There was, after all, a worldwide depression to combat, a jittery nation to reassure, a political campaign to organize. Herbert Hoover thought otherwise. “Never mind the arguments,” he told Press Secretary Ted Joslin, “I am going to see them.”106

“Now Bernice,” Hoover remarked to their thirteen-year-old leader, “tell me the whole story.” As he listened the muscles in his face twitched in an effort to control his emotions. As the girl finished, the president said that there must be a great deal of good in any man whose children were so devoted. “Now run along. I will use my good offices in this matter.” Then he took from his desk a keepsake for each. “You can have these to remember me by,” he said. When the children left the room, Hoover’s head dropped to his chest, and tears welled in his eyes. Embarrassed by his display of emotion, Hoover turned toward a window and called to Joslin. “Get that father out of jail immediately,” the president commanded.

Joslin asked permission to describe the dramatic encounter for the press. It was exactly the kind of story that would humanize the chief executive, drawing out the compassion that had once made him a global hero. Hoover would have none of it. The children might remember his act of kindness. But neither it, nor they, would be exploited for political advantage.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Uncommon Americans: The Lives and Legacies of Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.