Uncommon Americans: The Lives and Legacies of Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover

By Timothy Walch | Go to book overview

No Place Like Home:
Herbert Hoover and the
American Standard of Living

Regina Lee Blaszczyk

In 1926, Herbert Hoover—as the secretary of commerce in the cabinet of President Calvin Coolidge—outlined his ideas about the relationship between material life and moral well-being in Liberty, one of the nation’s top weekly magazines. In a characteristically straightforward manner, the commerce chief contended that the extension of home ownership to the majority of the American population would guarantee continued prosperity, morality, and security.

Hoover’s proposition was timely. According to the most recent federal census, some 54 percent of households still rented their living quarters. In this context, Hoover believed that the privately owned home was a social necessity, one that stimulated “family ideals” while encouraging individuals to explore their creative impulses. With these claims, Hoover postulated an intimate connection between environment, personal fulfillment, and community stability. To foster such linkages he praised the cities and towns that embraced the new practice of zoning, urged bankers to devise better methods for making mortgages accessible to the masses, and commended the architectural profession for disseminating plans for well-designed small houses. In Hoover’s equation, the private home—a single-family dwelling on a suburban lot—constituted the cornerstone of the American dream. Indeed, in Hoover’s eyes, home ownership was the “first necessity of the American standard of living.”271

Hoover’s convictions about domestic tranquility and home life held enormous appeal to the men and women who read such middle-class magazines as Liberty, Saturday Evening Post, Delineator, Woman’s Home Companion, and Ladies’ Home Journal during the 1920s. To many, the commerce secretary’s aspiration to put a chicken in every pot—his aim to create a nation of homeowners—seemed within easy grasp, if only because of the decade’s buoyant quantity-production economy and unbridled technological

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Uncommon Americans: The Lives and Legacies of Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.