Upon Further Review: Sports in American Literature

By Michael Cocchiarale; Scott D. Emmert | Go to book overview

About the Editors and Contributors

LISA ABNEY is the Director of the Louisiana Folklife Center and an Associate Professor of English at Northwestern State University. She directs the Natchitoches/NSU Folk Festival and the public programming of the Louisiana Folklife Center, a division of NSU. Dr. Abney has coedited Songs of the New South: Writing Contemporary Louisiana and Songs of the Reconstructing South: Building Literary Louisiana, 1865–1945. She has also coedited the 21st Century American Novelists volume in the Dictionary of Literary Biography series. Dr. Abney continues work on the Linguistic Survey of North Louisiana and research into grave, burial, and memorial traditions in the Ark-La-Tex region. She is currently working on a manuscript “The Last Respects: Grave Digging by Hand in Northern and Central Louisiana.” She serves as an Associate Editor for the Longman anthology of Southern literature, entitled Voices of the American South, and has written over thirty articles regarding linguistics, folklore, and literature of the American South. She has written over fifteen funded grants.

GREG AHRENHOERSTER earned his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, writing about sport in twentieth-century American fiction for his dissertation. He has published articles in Aethlon about the use of sports references by William Faulkner and Ralph Ellison. A long-time fan of William Shakespeare and the Milwaukee Brewers, Greg is an expert on tragedy. He currently teaches English at the University of Wisconsin-Waukesha.

RYAN K. ANDERSON is a Ph.D. candidate in U.S. History at Purdue University. His research interests center on social and cultural topics including gender, youth, popular culture, and the history of the book. He wishes to thank Professors Randy Roberts, David Welkey, and Michael Butler for their

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