Lincoln on Democracy

By Mario M. Cuomo; Harold Holzer et al. | Go to book overview

Lincoln, the Nation, and
the World: A Chronology
1809–1865

The following chronicle charts not only the history of Abraham Lin- coln’s life but also external events that surely shaped it. It attempts to place him within the context of both national and world events, as well as the cultural and scientific breakthroughs that were at the same time enriching mid-nineteenth-century society.

Whenever possible, the chronology adapts Lincoln’s own, all-too- rare words of self-description—drawn from his two pre-Civil War autobiographical sketches—to enhance descriptions of his early experi- ences. Unfortunately, while these “little sketches” constitute funda- mental building blocks in the Lincoln story, they are seldom revealing. As prolific as he was overall—his collected speeches and letters now fill ten volumes—Lincoln never kept a personal diary of his day-to-day activities, never recorded his innermost thoughts in a personal journal. The only time he ventured to start a scrapbook, he filled it with official newspaper reprints of his debates with Stephen A. Douglas. Even most of his letters to intimate friends were rarely revealing. Familiar though he is to us, he remains always elusive, a baffling mystery, whether intentionally or not, of his own making.

There can of course be little mystery about Lincoln’s enormous influence on history, but we cannot tell for certain how well informed Lincoln himself ever became about the world around him, or even precisely when he began to pay close attention to events unfolding in his own country. Save for the Mexican War, which he opposed, Lin- coln’s autobiographical sketches barely mentioned events outside the crisis-roiled United States. Likewise, his speeches and letters paid no more than occasional attention to global affairs.

-355-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lincoln on Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 416

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.