Lincoln on Democracy

By Mario M. Cuomo; Harold Holzer et al. | Go to book overview

Biographies of the
Editors and Contributors

MARIO M. CUOMO was elected the fifty-second governor of New York in 1982, and reelected in 1986 by the widest margin in the state’s history. The governor has devoted his administration to the themes of “jobs and justice” for all New Yorkers, and among its accomplishments have been the creation of more than one million new jobs, farsighted investments to rebuild the state’s vast infra- structure, and establishment of the lowest state tax rates in twenty years. In addition, Governor Cuomo gained widespread recognition as one of this gener- ation’s great public speakers after his eloquent keynote address at the 1984 Democratic National Convention. He has since delivered two widely ac- claimed addresses on Lincoln: at the Abraham Lincoln Association in Spring- field, Illinois, in 198S, and at the national cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsyl- vania, in 1989, in both of which he exhorted Americans to complete Lincoln’s “unfinished work.” The governor is the author of two books: Forest Hills Diary: The Crisis of Low-Income Housing (1974) and Diaries of Mario M. Cuomo: The Campaign for Governor (1983). He has also published The Cuomo Commission Report: A New American Formula for a Strong Economy (1988).

HAROLD HOLZER is the coauthor of The Lincoln Image: Abraham Lincoln and the Popular Print (1984), Changing the Lincoln Image (1985), The Con- federate Image: Prints of the Lost Cause (1987), and The Lincoln Family Album (1990). He has also written two pamphlets on Lincoln and more than 150 articles in newspapers, magazines, and historical journals, and has lectured widely on the subject throughout the United States and in England. Among his awards for his Lincoln writings are the Barondess Award of the Civil War Round Table, the Diploma of Honor from Lincoln Memorial University, and the Award of Achievement from the Lincoln Group of New York. Holzer serves in the Cuomo administration as special counselor to the director of economic development. He lives in Rye, New York.

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