Legal Feminism: Activism, Lawyering, and Legal Theory

By Ann Scales | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people have helped in many ways with this book. Judge Robert Henry of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit instigated the project and encouraged me to reach out to judges. The University of Denver College of Law provided summer research support that made it possible to do this, rather than other work.

Diane Burkhardt and the staff of the University of Denver College of Law library have been wonderfully responsive, thorough, and prompt. The same is true of my research assistants, Matthew Linton, Dara Lum, Lukas Staks, and Keelin Griffin. The students in my Advanced Jurispru- dence seminar in the spring of 2005 read an earlier draft, commented extensively, and identified exemplars of the ideas I address. My friend and former colleague Jane Caputi read an earlier draft, and provided invaluable insight about what nonlawyers needed to benefit from this book. My editor, Deborah Gershenowitz, kept me on track and pro- vided cheerful confidence that I could not have mustered on my own. Finally, Laura Spitz has been tirelessly generous in the editing of the text and discussion of the ideas. Thanks to all of you. Errors and misjudg- ments are my own.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Legal Feminism: Activism, Lawyering, and Legal Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I Places of Stuckness - Roles, Rules, Facts, and the Liberal View of Human Nature 15
  • 1 - The Rule of Law 17
  • 2 - Certainty and Doubt 32
  • 3 - Intractable Questions 47
  • 4 - The Limits of Liberalism 63
  • Part II Places beyond Stuckness - Feminist Notions, Controversies, and Promises 81
  • 5 - Feminist Legal Theory 83
  • 6 - Feminist Legal Method 100
  • 7 - False Consciousness 120
  • 8 - The Future of Legal Feminism 137
  • Notes 153
  • Index 209
  • About the Author 219
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 220

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.