The Long Divergence: How Islamic Law Held Back the Middle East

By Timur Kuran | Go to book overview

7
Barriers to the Emergence of a
Middle Eastern Business Corporation

It was in the late sixteenth century that European commercial enterprises started being organized as corporations. The voyages of global discovery and the consequent invigoration of overseas trade formed the impetus for this development. The commercial expansion relied on capital outlays for unusually long periods and from growing numbers of investors. However, various practices essential to the workings of the business corporation had already emerged over preceding centuries. The early variants of the business corporation combined known organizational features, though in novel ways.

Some of those features did not emerge at all in the Middle East. Others did, but their applications were suppressed for political reasons. The resulting deficiencies explain why Sirket-i Hayriye could not have been founded as a corporation and why, in instituting their corporate laws, Turkey and Egypt looked abroad for a model. Equally telling is that the Turkish and Egyptian transplants were accompanied by complementary institutional reforms. Evidently there were multiple obstacles to the indigenous emergence of the corporation.

As a prelude to developing these points, we must familiarize ourselves with the European path to the modern business corporation. Its most salient aspect is the organizational dynamism of various business communities. Diverse organizational forms were tried, by combining organizational features in distinct ways. Why analogous organizational dynamism was lacking in the Middle East requires investigation. The key issue is not why any particular

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Long Divergence: How Islamic Law Held Back the Middle East
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 405

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.