A Modern Legal Ethics: Adversary Advocacy in a Democratic Age

By Daniel Markovits | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Many, many people, both individually and in groups, have helped me to write this book. All of them deserve thanks.

Anthony Kronman sympathetically supervised a student paper that developed an early version of the book’s central ideas, which eventually became an article, entitled “Legal Ethics from the Lawyer’s Point of View,” published in the Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities. The faculties of the Law Schools at Florida State University, Harvard University, New York University, Stanford University, The University of Alabama, The University of Michigan, The University of Pennsylvania, The University of Toronto, and Yale University heard and commented on this article in workshops. And Geoffrey Hazard, Ted Schneyer, and Alec Walen contributed sustained and careful responses to the article to a mini-symposium published in a later issue of the Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities. Finally, Bruce Ackerman, Arthur Applbaum, Sarah Bilston, Guido Calabresi, David Cross, Owen Fiss, Risa Goluboff, Dan Kahan, Rick Lempert, Meira Levinson, Richard Schragger, Gil Seinfeld, Kenji Yoshino, and Noah Zatz provided informal but invaluable assessments of early versions of the argument. Without the observations and criticisms of these attentive readers, I could not have corrected and elaborated the initial formulation of the argument as the book has demanded.

As the book came into being, many of its parts benefited from receiving additional individual attention from still other readers. Dan Callcut and David Owens offered incisive assessments of some of the arguments concerning integrity in Part II. And audiences at Fordham University Law School’s conference titled “The Internal Point of View in Law and Ethics,” Washington & Lee University’s 28th Annual Legal Ethics Institute, and the 2006 Meeting of the Law & Society Association in Berlin, Germany, made important contributions to the argument of chapter 8. Greg Cooper, Ali Denham, David Luban, James Mahon, Bill Simon, and Brad Wendel made especially significant individual contributions to the chapter’s argument on these occasions. A version of this chapter was also published, under the title “Adversary Advocacy and the Authority of Adjudication,” in a symposium issue that the Fordham Law Review devoted to the Fordham Conference, and a much shorter and more informal account of the chapter’s argument appeared in the Yale Law Journal’s Pocket Part, under the title “In Praise of the Supporting Cast.”

The completed book received equally generous attention from many more readers, who worked their way through the entire manuscript.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Modern Legal Ethics: Adversary Advocacy in a Democratic Age
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 361

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.